technology

site area: 
Public phone with Voicemail written over it in red marker pen.

 In June, I gave a keynote at 'Writing in the Digital Age' at the Free Word Centre in London. I spoke about how new technologies are not just changing how writers market themselves, sell books or relate to the reader, but the possibilities of fiction itself. 

Audio and slides

site area: 
Bald Britney Spears having a breakdown

Mute magazine has published a special edition featuring some fictional futurism. Read Ben Seymour on the Department of Culture, Media and War, Laura Oldfield Ford of Savage Messiah

site area: 

1967 Future Prediction - PC

A clip from the 1967 film 199AD, predicting, among other things, the 'home post office'.

site area: 
Girl in a sweater, wandering in a field

 

If the Millennium meant anything at all, it was not about a digit change in a particular calendrical system, but the opportunity to contemplate the span of a thousand years. As the celebrations focused down on the fleeting instant of transition from 1999 to 2000, distracted by
site area: 
Skull drawing

June 1997. A sunny Saturday afternoon in West London. I've got my window open, and, like several other people on my street, I'm listening to the radio. There's a lot to choose from in this part of town. I could turn the dial to the bump-and-grind ragga rhythms of Station FM, or hear revival

site area: 
St Louis Arch

Brian looks at the "Mystic LED" by American DJ

 An interview with the author of Techgnosis: Myth, Magic and Mysticism in the Age of Information.

 
HK: One of the main strands of your book is tracing the suppressed mystical impulse in the history of technology. Why has this
site area: 
Monkey

This interview with Daniel Dennett was conducted soon after the publication of his study of evolution, Darwin's Dangerous Idea [Simon & Schuster 1995].

 HK: Why is a philosopher of mind interested in
site area: 
Microsoft Fitness poster

The herd of VIPs on the steps leading up to the San Francisco Masonic Auditorium turns away from the cameras to watch the spectacle. A frail-looking man, incongruously-dressed in running shorts and singlet, is weaving among the Versace-clad throng, looking like he must have sprinted all the way

site area: 
Cover of the first edition of Cybernetics book

DARPA's Bionic Arm

For Donna Haraway, we are already assimilated.

The monster opens the curtains of Victor Frankenstein's bed. Schwarzenegger tears back the skin of his forearm to display a gleaming skeleton of chrome and steel. Tetsuo's skin bubbles as wire and cable burst to the surface.

Pages

Subscribe to technology
X